This is to post your solutions to various issues such as re-routing idle air pathways, location of PCV Connections, and anything else that benefits The Gadgetman Groove modification.
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TOPIC: Improving Grounds

Improving Grounds 22 May 2020 01:45 #1

  • Tracy Gallaway
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I saw this short video on you tube, and thought it worthy of posting. While he's working with a Chevy/GM truck.it's just good advice to take heed of, IMHO. If you are working with a later model GM or Chevy truck, then here are some good specific ideas for those.

Tracy G

Tracy Gallaway
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Gadgetman Reno, NV
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Improving Grounds 22 May 2020 09:04 #2

  • Ron Hatton
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People seldom realize how incredibly important the ground locations are on their rides!

Just 0.25 VDC can dramatically alter your fuel trims!

Ron
Ron Hatton
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and Snake Oil-https://SnakeOil.wtf/?wpam_id=1

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Improving Grounds 22 May 2020 11:43 #3

  • GregK
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I LOOOOVE infrastructure stuff like this, because as Ron said, paying attention to the little things often leads to large rewards.

I believe I posted a YouTube vid a while back about proper wire joining and soldering techniques - and when I say proper, they meet Mil-Spec or higher. If they meet NASA's guidelines, surely they'll do wonders for everything and anything else. I'll have to go looking for that again. For that ring connector, crimping, soldering AND shrink wrapping is correct, as is the application of dielectric between mating surfaces and protectant on top of the mount point. (I like fluid film for that, and it's part of my maintenance routine to check and reapply as necessary)

Doubling up existing ground wires with similar gauge wiring is perfectly valid (I also had a website that showed what effecive wire guages end up as when you double and triple existing wiring)...but I'm a go big or go home guy, so if you're going to do it, don't be less than 2ga. double 0 is probably overkill for a car, but maybe not for a big diesel hauler or RV...or if you've got a kickin' stereo. Give those electrons a big, wide and smooth highway to travel on.
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Improving Grounds 03 Jan 2021 15:12 #4

  • GregK
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After 265k km (160k miles), the alternator in my Wendy gave up the ghost on me.
I upgraded to a higher Amperage output version (125A over the stock 105A), and while I was at it, I took the opportunity to take a good look at my charging/grounding system.
While everything was in good shape (save for cleaning off corrosion from 13 years of service), I decided to try adding a wire (of the same gauge as the main engine ground) from the back of the alternator case to the battery.

Here's where I got the idea from. while his description of how a rectifier changes the Alternating current produced by the generator into the Direct current your car runs on leaves something to be desired (in my opinion - look for videos on Bridge rectifiers to see why), the grounding message is valid:


As Ron said in this thread, a small difference in grounding can make a big difference:
after doing a re-learn and adjusting my EFIE, I'm now getting a nice, consistent 3.8L/100km (61.9 MPG-US) just scooting around town
I'm not sure if I can attribute it to the extra ground wire or the new alternator, but I'll take it!

Here's the link to the wire gauge calculator (I had a bunch of 14ga wire around and I just kept adding lengths until I got a 6ga equivalency):
Wire combination Calculator

But you should also check Voltage Drop
(checking for voltage drop over length at various gauges will help your battery live longer - use 13.8V rather than 12, because most voltage regulators lately are set at at least that point. I also used 5% voltage drop and am still good because the length of my cable is shorter than the max length in the calculator, and my charging voltage/regulator set point is 14.5VDC - that's the published spec, but I measure a few tenths of a volt higher. That might mean that the battery is de-sulfating and absorbing energy still. I should pop it open and check the electrolyte level in it)


As best I can recall, this battery is about 4 years old, give or take about 6 months - around the time that most batteries need replacing in cars. If I have to put a new one in in the future, I'll be sure to compare the date code to the date of replacement
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Last edit: by GregK.
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